Restricted Land Access Reduces Hunting Opportunities

Restricted access to hunting lands in the past three seasons, especially on private property, has reduced opportunities to hunt, according to a recent survey.

In the survey of about 2,000 hunters conducted in April 2008, just over one-third (34%) of hunters reported that restricted access to hunting lands reduced their hunting time over the past three seasons. Private hunting lands were more likely than public lands to have had restrictions placed on them, said 80% of the surveyed hunters.

Perhaps offering a glimmer of hope to those who love to hunt, exactly half (50%) of surveyed hunters said that their hunting opportunities had been “reduced” due to land restrictions, rather than eliminated entirely. Only about 7% of hunters reported that previously available hunting lands had been completely closed to them.

“Restricted land access continues to be a major issue affecting hunters,” commented Rob Southwick, designer of the survey.

Of the hunters who said their access to hunting lands had been restricted, more than half (about 58%) said that previously available land had been sold to a new owner who restricted hunting access, or that the landowner had given, leased, or sold hunting rights to others, making the land less available–or unavailable–to the survey respondents. More specifically, of those who said that previously available lands had seen new restrictions, about 31% reported that a new landowner had restricted their access for reasons other than providing hunting access to others, while about 28% said that hunting access had been granted to others, reducing or eliminating their own opportunities to hunt the land.

Source: Launched in 2006, HunterSurvey.com and TargetshootingSurvey.com help the firearms and outdoor equipment industries, government officials, and conservation organizations track consumer activities and expenditure trends. The list above represents only a small sample of the vast amount of information that is available from the complete survey results. The results are scientifically analyzed to reflect all U.S. hunters and target shooters. Find out how a subscription to the complete survey data can help your business, government agency, or organization.

Anglers Cite Access and Water Quality as Greatest Problems Facing Fishing

Access and water quality concerns are the biggest problems facing sport fishing today, according to a recent survey. In an April 2008 survey of more than 2,000 anglers, over 42% named access to water or water quality as the greatest threat to their sport. Specifically, 24% of anglers surveyed cited access to water as the chief problem facing fishing, while 18% named water quality problems as the greatest threat.

“Clearly, access and water quality issues are of considerable concern to today’s anglers,” said Rob Southwick, who designed the survey.

Other threats to their sport cited by surveyed anglers included “too expensive” (15%); “invasive species” (13%); “not enough fish” (just under 12%); and “too many anglers” (just over 4%).

Source: Launched in 2006, AnglerSurvey.com helps the outdoor equipment industry, government fishery officials, and conservation organizations track consumer activities and expenditure trends. The list above represents only a small sample of the vast amount of information that is available from the complete survey results. The results are scientifically analyzed to reflect all U.S. anglers. Find out how a subscription to the complete survey data can help your business, government agency, or organization.