I cant tell you how excited I was to open up my November issue of National Geographic and get to see they had an article about the North American Conservation Model.  I have been a member since I was about 5 years old of National Geographic and the story was absolutely fantastic.  The pictures are great and the story is of the quality that one can expect from such a fantastic magazine.

The following is a press release from Pheasants Forever:

St. Paul, Minn. – October 24, 2007 – Just in time for hunting season, the
November issue of National Geographic magazine contains the feature
“Hunters: Conserving the Land.” In the story, you’ll be able to see and
read about Pheasants Forever’s (PF) conservation efforts.

Written by Robert M. Poole with stunning photography from William Albert
Allard, the story focuses on hunters as strong supporters of the land and
wildlife conservation. It also examines the declining number of hunters in
the U.S. and poses the question: Will a new generation take the field?

“We’re excited to see Pheasants Forever as a part of this comprehensive
story on hunting and conservation,” said Bob St.Pierre, PF Director of
Marketing & Public Relations, “It’s important that these issues continue to
garner mainstream attention, and we’re hoping some of the 5 million monthly
readers of National Geographic will be motivated to join our conservation
efforts.”

The story appears on pages 112 through 139. In fact, the story opens with a
two-page photo spread of a PF project – an 800-acre reserve along Coffee
Creek, Montana. Pages 118 & 119 of the story also contain a photo spread of
PF members on a pheasant hunt in Eureka, South Dakota.

To see the story online, log onto
http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/2007-11/hunters/poole-text.html .
You’ll also be able to view a photo gallery, reporter and photographer
field notes and more.

Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever are non-profit conservation
organizations dedicated to the protection and enhancement of pheasant,
quail, and other wildlife populations in North America through habitat
improvement, land management, public awareness, and education.  PF/QF has
more than 115,000 members in 700 local chapters across the continent.