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Tyler Jordan Hunting Life Interview

Tyler Jordan, you have had the opportunity to grow up in the outdoor industry and a tremendous amount has changed in your lifetime.  What do you see as some of the best changes you have had the opportunity to see in regards to hunting? 

  • One of the biggest changes I have seen is just the overall knowledge hunters have of deer and the ability to grow big deer all over the country is at its peak in my opinion. One of the key factors that changed for us in Georgia over the last 15 years is the use of trail cameras and having a better inventory of your deer herd. Getting to know deer in your area and what their patterns might be can set you up to be a more successful hunter. 

How did you come to partner with HOIST? What about their product or brand are most interesting to you? 

  • My buddy Greg Camp with Halo Waterfowl was the first person who reached out to me about trying Hoist. What HOIST has provided us over the course of this past hunting season is the ability to stay out and hunt longer. During the rut there are many times we hunt all day and this product provides us with the opportunity to stay hydrated for those long sits. Many times it was the only drink I took to the stand with me and it was all I needed to sit from daylight to dark without experiencing dehydration. 

As hunters, we all have those individuals who have inspired us and mentored us and without question, we know that is your father.  What is the single most important thing you have learned from your father in regards to hunting and the outdoors?

  • The biggest takeaway from what my dad has taught me is to always leave things better than you found it so we can preserve what we have for generations to come. Don’t be greedy when it comes to the resources that we are all blessed to share with one another. Leave it better for the next person that comes along! 

What is the single most important thing your father has taught you about business?

  • Passions of the business may get you started, but having a business plan and strategies is what keeps you going for the long haul. Dad has always been a forward thinker and dreamer which has taught me it’s important to be smart, set goals and follow your plan for you and your fellow co-workers to stay on the right track. 

We have that one single hunt where everything went wrong and yet we still walked away with a lesson learned from the experience.  What was that hunt for you and what did you learn?

  • While turkey hunting I’ve been humbled a lot and that’s why it’s probably my favorite species to hunt. But when you think you’ve got those birds figured out they remind you quickly there’s still a lot to learn. When I’ve had things go wrong in turkey hunting it’s usually because I’ve pressed the issue too much on a turkey whether it’s trying to get closer or over calling. I’ve learned through the years the best thing to do sometimes is to let certain situations develop and read what their mood/behavior is at that particular moment. Don’t make rash decisions! 

The world of hunting has gotten smaller over the last 40 years.  It has been stated that hunter numbers have decreased dramatically.  In your opinion, what do you think can be done to increase hunter participation among our citizens?

  • This kind of goes back to what my dad has taught me in that it’s our responsibility to pass this tradition on in anyway we can. On our hunting land in Georgia we try to take several close friends of ours and their family hunting for the first time just so they are exposed to it. “Take a child hunting and fishing so they too can enjoy the outdoors”. That’s the saying my dad ended every show with and the motto we all should live by with not just our own families, but others, too. 

Everyone wants to know what is your gear breakdown and in your pack for archery hunts?  Rifle Hunts?

  • Outdoor Edge skinning knife, 2 pull up ropes, 4 different Realtree EZ Hangers, Nose Jammer spray bottle, Nose Jammer Wax Stick, wind checker, Bushnell Harness with binoculars and range finder, Bushnell headlamp,rattling horns and Bone Collector grunt call. Only thing I’d change up with my rifle hunt pack is having my Federal ammunition. 

How important is planning for proper hydration when you’re out on a road trip? 

  • Planning for proper hydration for a road trip is super important. It’s easy to think about proper hydration during hot weather days when you’re on a long stalk, or hanging treestands. But what most people don’t think about is staying hydrated during super cold weather hunts. It’s hard to make yourself drink cold fluids in below freezing temperatures because you’re doing everything you can to stay warm. Not ingest cold beverages. That’s why i like Hoist. You can drink less of it and stay properly hydrated quicker than you would with water or other sports drinks. 

What’s the main difference you’ve seen in HOIST vs other hydration products you may have used to consume? 

  • The thing i like about hoist vs other sports drinks is that it seems to take effect and hydrate me quicker than anything else. When i get my mind focused on doing something out on the farm, sometimes I don’t drink enough fluids for the task at hand. Drinking Hoist tends to help with dehydration headaches quicker than any other sports drinks that i’ve consumed in the past. 

Tyler Jordan, what question do you wish someone would ask you?  What is the answer?

  • What is your favorite animal to hunt? I bet because of Realtree Monster Bucks you’d probably think it would be whitetail, but turkey hunting is my all-time favorite. If you’re a diehard whitetail hunter and want to get out to chase turkeys in the spring, it will make you a better outdoorsman. They present an interesting challenge and have insanely good vision, which makes your camo choice important. If you haven’t already, get out this upcoming spring and sharpen your hunting skills.

Kevin Paulson

Kevin Paulson is the Founder and CEO of HuntingLife.com. His passion for Hunting began at the age of 5 hunting alongside of his father. Kevin has followed his dreams through outfitting, conservation work, videography and hunting trips around the world.

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